It’s everyone’s responsibility

We all have a shared responsibility for safe road use – drivers, motorcyclists, cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders.

Advice for towns and built up areas

It’s really important to consider other road users when you’re travelling in built-up areas. Here are five ways we can all keep safe on the roads in town:

  1. Stop speeding before speeding stops you
    You are seven times as likely to kill a pedestrian if you hit them at 30mph rather than 20mph.1
  2. Pay extra attention at junctions
    Research shows that almost half (49%) of pedestrian casualties happen at junctions and that less than half of drivers (47%) look out for pedestrians at junctions. Therefore, it’s important to take your time and an extra look before crossing or turning at a junction.2
  3. Read the road
    Is the road busy? What’s the weather like? Figures show 96% of accidents involving pedestrians happen in built-up areas, with most casualties happening during the evening commute or after lunch at weekends. It’s definitely worth checking in with what’s going on around you and adjusting your speed and route appropriately.3
  4. Try not to rush
    More than half admit to taking risks – jumping amber lights or travelling over the speed limit – just to get somewhere seconds earlier. Accidents can happen when people are in a rush, so always leave enough time for your journey. And when it’s busy, the best approach is to take a breath, and keep your speed in check.4
  5. Watch out for unexpected hazards
    One in twenty admit to travelling on ‘autopilot’ every day and not paying full attention. Keep your eyes peeled; unexpected hazards, such as roadworks or a speeding vehicle may be just around the corner.4

Sources:

  1. DfT Road Safety Web Publication No.16: Relationship between Speed and Risk of Fatal Injury: Pedestrians and Car Occupants
  2. Think! 2013
  3. Transport Scotland – Reported Road Casualties Scotland 2017
  4. Censuswide survey of 1,012 Scottish adults (02.02.2018 – 06.02.2018)

Considering your road position

Slow down and adjust your road position so that you’re not too close to the kerb. You’ll give yourself more time to react to any unexpected hazards such as a pedestrian stepping out, or a cyclist swerving to avoid a drain.

The Consequences

Speed is a major factor in accidents and also impacts on their severity. You are seven times as likely to kill a pedestrian if you hit them at 30mph rather than 20mph.1

Going too fast in town can have severe penalties for drivers:

  • A fine of at least £100.
  • A minimum of 3 penalty points – you could even lose your licence if you’ve built up 12 or more points over 3 years.
  • Not to mention the risk to you, your passengers, and other road users.

Plus, if you’re a new driver:

  • You only need 6 points to lose your licence in the first 2 years of driving. If you’re caught speeding twice, you could lose your licence – this means going through the whole process of applying for your provisional and resitting your test all over again.
  1. Transport Scotland – Key Reported Road Casualties 2018

Support the campaign

To support our campaign we’ve launched a handy toolkit that explains more about the campaign. It includes key messages, social media posts, and newsletter copy.